Speakers - 2015 Conference on Inclusion and Diversity in Library & Information Science (CIDLIS) - Oct. 15 - 16

 

Renee Franklin Hill

Assistant Professor of Practice, Syracuse University

Dr. Renee F. Hill was born in Houston, TX and raised in Fort Lauderdale, FL. She has lived in Syracuse, NY since 2007. Renee is married to Thomas Hill and they have five children ranging in age from 22 years to 19 months. Renee earned a Bachelor's degree in Exceptional Student Education at Florida Atlantic University. Both her Master's and Ph.D. were earned in Library and Information Studies at Florida State University. She is an Assistant Professor of Practice in Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies where she teaches courses that prepare graduate students to enter the school library media profession. Renee is passionate about and committed to researching and teaching about issues that involve examining methods for increasing understanding of diversity issues in Library and Information Studies. Her work focuses on examining information needs and information access as they relate to diverse populations (e.g., members of various racial/ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities).

Keynote - But I Didn’t Mean it That Way: Identifying, Understanding, and Eliminating Microaggressions in LIS and Beyond

9:00am, McKeldin Special Events Room

Irene Owens

Dean, School of Library and Information Science, North Carolina Central University

In 2005, Dr. Irene Owens was appointed Dean of the North Carolina Central University School of Library and Information Sciences. Prior to this appointment, she served as Associate Professor & Graduate Advisor at the University of Texas at Austin where she received the 2000 Texas Excellence in Teaching Award and in the same year was the first African American to earn tenure at the University of Texas now School of Information. Dr. Owens is a 1994 graduate of the Ph.D. program of the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science, and in 2006 she received that School’s Distinguished Alumna Award. Other selected awards include the Howard University Award for Distinguished Service and the Publications Award, the 2007 North Carolina Library Association Award for Library Education, the 2010 DEMCO/BCALA Award for Excellence in Librarianship and the 2011 National Council of Negro Women, Inc. award for Distinguished Professional Achievement. In December 2013 she was selected to participate in the “Inner Strengths of Successful Leaders” program at Harvard University. She was recently selected for two distinguished appointments, one to the UNC-CH Press Board of Governors (July 1, 2012- June 30, 2017) and the Committee on Accreditation of the American Library Association (July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2016).

She is the author of several publications and compiler and editor of two books, Strategic Marketing in Library and Information Sciences and Acquisitions and Collection Development in the Humanities, she is also the recipient of numerous grants including three prestigious Laura Bush 21st Century awards, the Association of Research Library Awards, and the Lilly Foundation.

In addition to the Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Owens holds an MLS from the University of Maryland, a Master of Arts from Howard University, and a Bachelor of Science from Barber-Scotia College.

Keynote - Beyond the Visual: Continuing Implementation of Diversity in Workplace Leadership and Communities

3:30pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Alex Sharp

Student, University of Oklahoma

Alex Sharp is an opera-singing librarian originally from New Orleans, LA where she received a Bachelor of Music degree in Vocal Performance. She currently resides in Tulsa, OK where she is pursuing her MLIS and focusing on archival studies as well as diversity and pluralism in the information world. She hopes to become a music librarian/archivist and be surrounded by her two loves - books and music - and is so pleased to be presenting at this conference.

A Critical Analysis of Literature Regarding the LGBTIQ Community and Issues of Access in Established Classification

1:15pm, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Alma Lopez

Student, University of Washington

Alma Lopez is a 2nd year MLIS student at the University of Washington, with a main interest in public librarianship and finding ways to increase inclusivity in both academia and with the public community at large.

Express to Transform: Developing an Equitable Diversity Climate Survey

11:00am, McKeldin Special Events Room

Andrea Thomas

Prince George's County Memorial Library System

Andrea Thomas is an attorney turned librarian. Her passion is helping her community and she is delighted to be able to be of service to her community though the Prince George’s County Memorial Library System. Currently, she’s working on a special project in the Sojourner Truth Room of the Oxon Hill Branch of the PGCMLS as a Curating Intern. She also volunteers time at the Scott Library located on the campus of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in Washington, DC where she teaches computer classes to World War II veterans.

Sojourner Truth Room: An Innovation Space

3:30pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Beth St. Jean

Assistant Professor, University of Maryland

Beth St. Jean is an Assistant Professor in the College of Information Studies, the Assistant Director of the Information Policy and Access Center, and an affiliate faculty member of the Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy at the University of Maryland. Her research aims to improve people's long-term health outlooks by exploring the important interrelationships between their health-related information behaviors, their health literacy, their health-related self-efficacy, and their health behaviors.

Leveraging School-Library-Based After-School Programs to Motivate, Engage, and Benefit Youth from Disadvantaged Backgrounds

1:15pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Bharat Mehra

Associate Professor, University of Tennessee

Bharat Mehra is Associate Professor in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee. His research examines diversity and intercultural communication, social justice in library and information science (LIS), critical and cross-cultural studies, and community informatics or the use of information and communication technologies to empower minority and underserved populations to make meaningful changes in their everyday lives. Mehra has applied conceptual frameworks in LIS with interdisciplinary approaches to expand the profession’s traditional definition, scope, extent, representation, and relevance in the 21st century. He has collaborated with racial/ethnic groups, international communities, sexual minorities, rural librarians, small businesses, and others, to represent their experiences in shaping the design and development of various community-based information systems and services.

Evaluation of E-government Online Information Resources for Families of Children with ADHD: An Information Map

11:00am, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

An Exploratory Action Plan in Diversity Management at Multiple Levels for the Academic Library to Support Female African American Graduate Students

1:15pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Cheryl Ann Lambert

Assistant Professor, Boston University

Cheryl Ann Lambert earned her Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee where her primary area of study was public relations. Her scholarship in persuasion has included studies of media representations and social constructions of public relations, health, and communication professions. She has published articles about corporate communications and health care opinion leaders and book chapters about propaganda and participatory journalism. Lambert has presented scholarship at national and international conferences. Her professional experience includes seven years in corporate communications and five years at a national trade publication, which informs her academic scholarship.

An Exploratory Action Plan in Diversity Management at Multiple Levels for the Academic Library to Support Female African American Graduate Students

1:15pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Christie Kodama

Doctoral Student, University of Maryland

Christie Kodama is a doctoral student in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland. Her research interests include early learners' access to and use of information; technology and information literacy for early learners; the use of new technologies in teaching and learning, the role of school libraries in student achievement, and urban school librarianship.

Leveraging School-Library-Based After-School Programs to Motivate, Engage, and Benefit Youth from Disadvantaged Backgrounds

1:15pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Dana Casciotti

Program Analyst, National Library of Medicine (NIH)

Dana Casciotti is a Program Analyst in the Office of Health Information Programs Development at the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. Her research interests include the impact of health communication and health literacy on social and behavioral factors related to public health.

Leveraging School-Library-Based After-School Programs to Motivate, Engage, and Benefit Youth from Disadvantaged Backgrounds

1:15pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Dave Pantzer

People's Law Web Content Coordinator, Maryland State Law Library

Dave Pantzer leads a network of volunteer attorneys, librarians, government employees and students, who create, edit, and translate plain language legal information for the Maryland People’s Law Library. Dave teaches at Towson University, and provides training on plain language legal writing. Dave has worked for the Social Security Administration and as a law clerk to the Honorable Michael J. Stamm. Dave serves on the board of the Pro Bono Resource Center of Maryland; serves as vice-chair of the Maryland State Bar Association Section on the Delivery of Legal Services; and serves on the nominating committee of the Maryland Christian Legal Society.

Full service: How law libraries can use technology to help diverse, underserved populations understand the law

10:00am, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Dennis Linders

Student, University of Maryland

Dennis Linders is a CountyStat Analyst in the Office of the Montgomery County Executive. In this role, he helps the county use data to improve performance and solve problems, including in the areas of customer service excellence, services to seniors and immigrants, sustainability, and community analytics. Dennis joined CountyStat from the World Bank's Urban Development global practice, where he worked on data-driven urbanization strategies and helped cities learn from each other. Originally from the Netherlands, Dennis is completing his PhD dissertation on data-driven government and "smart cities" at the University of Maryland iSchool.

Community Analytics: Translating Big and Small Data into Community Insights for Collective Impact

11:00am, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Eyoel Delessa

Prince George's County Memorial Library System

A native of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Eyoel Delessa moved to the United States with his family at the age of 8 years old. His father was a diplomat in the Ethiopian Embassy in Washington, DC and therefore decided to raise his children in Montgomery County, Maryland. Eyoel earned his B.A in Government and Politics with a Minor in Philosophy from UMD. He has his MLS from UMD with a specialization in Information and Diverse Populations. Eyoel has had the opportunity to work as a Public Administrative Assistant with the Montgomery County Public Library System, as an Instructor for UNIV103: Student Success Strategies at the University of Maryland, and as a Curating Intern with the Prince George's County Memorial Library System.

Sojourner Truth Room: An Innovation Space

3:30pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Faith Rusk

Student, University of Maryland

Faith Rusk is pursuing her masters in Library Science at the University of Maryland. She is interested in information literacy, information issues in the developing world, and issues of diversity related to information. Faith works in the MLS program office as a graduate assistant and also teaches information literacy classes to first year students as part of her Academic Library Research and Teaching Services Fellowship with McKeldin Library. Faith received her B.A. in Comparative Literature from Barnard College, Columbia University.

A Broader Perspective: How International Opportunities Enhance the Education of Information Professionals

2:30pm, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Fiona Jardine

Doctoral Student, University of Maryland

Fiona Jardine is a PhD student at UMD’s iSchool and has an MLS specializing in Information and Diverse Populations. Her background in the law allows Fiona to combine legal issues, policy, and LIS in her research on access to information by incarcerated people.

As the Historian of student group iDiversity, she gets to work with amazing students on information-related diversity projects, then document it. Fiona is a Graduate Writing Fellow, so provides one-on-one writing consultations for graduate students in any program.

Fiona is originally from York, England, but moved to America in 2008. She is a fairly decent knitter, needle felter, and seamstress, an ardent animal lover, counting bees, prairie dogs, and a free-roaming sulcata tortoise among her animal menagerie, and lives up to the English stereotype of drinking lots of tea.

ACCESS DENIED: inmates and digital information

10:00am, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Irlanda Jacinto

University Archivist, University of Wyoming

Irlanda Jacinto grew up on the border cities of El Paso, TX and Ciudad Juarez. She graduated from the University of Texas at El Paso with dual bachelor degrees in history and anthropology. She attended graduate school at the University of Arizona as a Knowledge River Scholar and graduated with a MA in Information Resources and Library Science. Her thesis applied the cultural competence framework to the University of Huston’s hip hop collection. Currently she works at the American Heritage Center where she serves as University Archivist for the University of Wyoming.

Coming to terms with privilege: analysis of the self for the creation of culturally competent LIS professionals

10:00am, McKeldin Special Events Room

Jen-Chien Yu

Coordinator for Library Assessment, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Jen-chien Yu is the Coordinator for Library Assessment at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She coordinates library assessment programs; works closely with faculty and staff across the Library and around the campus to design and implement assessment activities that supports data-informed decision making related to library services, collections, technology, and facilities.

Jen has served on many committees and working groups related to diversity and academic librarianship. She is a life member for CALA, the Chinese-American Librarians Association. She was the CALA Midwest Chapter President (2009-2010), CALA At-Large Board of Directors (2008-2011). She is also a life member for APALA (Asian Pacific American Librarians Association).

Big or Small? The dilemma between organization size and inclusiveness in libraries

10:00am, McKeldin Special Events Room

Jennifer (Cong Yan) Zhao

Liaison Librarian, McGill University

Jennifer Zhao is a liaison librarian at McGill University’s Schulich Library of Science and Engineering in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. She manages outreach, instruction, reference service, and collection management for Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Physical Geography, and participates in various projects across the library. Her research interests include information literary, collection development, library service and instruction for international students, and innovation in library services.

Meeting diversity on campus: A multilingual library orientation approach

2:30pm, St. Mary's Hall Special Events Room

Kafi D. Kumasi

Associate Professor, Wayne State University

Kafi Kumasi is an Associate Professor at Wayne State University School of Library and Information Science. Dr. Kumasi teaches in the areas of school library media, urban librarianship, multicultural services and resources, and research methods. A Laura Bush 21st century scholar, she holds a PhD in Curriculum Studies from Indiana University, Bloomington; the MLIS from Wayne State; and a BS in Education from the University of Michigan. Kumasi’s research interests revolve around issues of literacy, equity and diversity, particularly in urban educational environments spanning K12 and graduate school contexts. In addition to her teaching and research duties, Kumasi serves as the Faculty Liaison/Lead Instructor for the School’s current IMLS grant, Project IDoL, Increasing the Diversity of Librarianship, and as a Mentor for The Lilead Fellows Program, an advanced professional development opportunity for school district library supervisors.

Bending the Paradigmatic Arch of Research in LIS Towards Social Justice

1:15pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Kerry Falloon

Assistant Professor, College of Staten Island

Kerry Falloon is an Assistant Professor and supervisor of the Acquisitions unit at the College of Staten Island (CSI) Library. Professor Falloon manages the purchasing of materials for the library, including joint collections with CUNY, as well as participates in serials and e-resources collection development. In addition to her MLIS, Professor Falloon also has an Educational Specialist Degree in School Psychology, and a prior history working with developmentally disabled children. She assisted the current librarian liaison to the Center for Student Accessibility at the College of Staten Island. Professor Falloon’s research interests include patron driven acquisitions, resource management and collection building, and making libraries user friendly for special populations.

Accessibility and Inclusion Issues in Acquisitions Services: Marketing and Evaluating Electronic Resources

2:30pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Kimberly Douglass

 

Douglass is the Interim Associate Director and an Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, School of Information Sciences (SIS). Douglass' research examines knowledge infrastructures, including e-government. While Douglass' research has focused largely upon public infrastructures, she is also interested in infrastructure created by everyday people. In particular, she is interested in the infrastructures that families of children with special needs coordinate around their own information needs and the information needs of other families of children with special needs. Douglass teaches courses on government information sources, management of information organizations, and information policy.

Evaluation of E-government Online Information Resources for Families of Children with ADHD: An Information Map

11:00am, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

LaVerne Gray

Student, University of Tennessee Knoxville

LaVerne Gray, MLIS(Dominican University), MSEd(Northern Illinois University) is currently a doctoral student and American Library Association (ALA) Spectrum Doctoral Fellow at the College of Communication and Information with a concentration in Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her former positions include; Learning and Outreach librarian at Texas A&M University, Reference Librarian at University of Illinois at Chicago, and Diversity Resident Librarian at University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Her research interests include social justice movements in library communities of service, diversity in the academic library profession, and critical librarianship practice.

Muted Voices: African-American Women Librarians in the Academy

11:00am, McKeldin Special Events Room

Lonelyss Charles

Informationist/Bio-Medical Librarian

Lonelyss Charles is an informationist/biomedical librarian with over ten years of experience in the field. Select earlier positions include contract librarian for the World Health Organization, contract librarian for the American Urological Association, and National Library of Medicine Fellow. Ms. Charles graduated from the University of Pittsburgh SILS programs.

Demographics as Destiny: Do LIS Professionals and Schools Reflect Current and Future Trends in the US Population?

11:00am, McKeldin Special Events Room

Mega Subramaniam

Associate Professor, University of Maryland

Mega Subramaniam is an Associate Professor in the College of Information Studies, and Associate Director of the Information Policy and Access Center at the University of Maryland. Her research focuses on enhancing the role of libraries in fostering the mastery of information and new media literacy so essential to the learning of science and mathematics among underserved young people.

Leveraging School-Library-Based After-School Programs to Motivate, Engage, and Benefit Youth from Disadvantaged Backgrounds

1:15pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Melissa A. Adler

Associate Professor, University of Kentucky

Melissa Adler is Assistant Professor in the School of Information Science and Faculty Affiliate with Gender & Women’s Studies and the Committee on Social Theory at the University of Kentucky. Her book manuscript, The Perverse Library: Knowledge Organization and the History of Sexuality, is currently under contract with Fordham University Press. She has published in Information & Culture, the Journal of the History of Sexuality, and Knowledge Organization. She currently serves as chair-elect of the Classification Research special interest group of the Association for Information Science and Technology.

Indexing Intersectionality: Diversity and Inclusion as Problems of Classification

1:15pm, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Michelle Y. Ewert

Clinical Teaching Fellow, University of Baltimore

Michelle Ewert teaches at the University of Baltimore School of Law’s Civil Advocacy Clinic. Previously, she worked as staff attorney at HOPE Fair Housing in Wheaton, Illinois; staff attorney at Central California Legal Services in Visalia, California; and staff attorney and housing law supervisor at the Homeless Persons Representation Project in Baltimore. Ewert serves on the MSBA Delivery of Legal Services Section Council. She earned her J.D. from the University of Wisconsin, her masters in public policy from the University of Minnesota, and her B.A. in international studies from Illinois Wesleyan University. She is a member of the Wisconsin, Illinois, California and Maryland bars.

Full service: How law libraries can use technology to help diverse, underserved populations understand the law

10:00am, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Natalie Greene Taylor

Doctoral Candidate, University of Maryland

Natalie Greene Taylor is a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland. She is a Graduate Research Associate at the Information Policy & Access Center. Her research interests include the intersection of information and health literacy, information seeking behavior in children, the efficacy of government resources targeted to youth, and school and public libraries' roles in literacy education.

Reliable and Misleading, Secretive and Factual: Tweens’ Dichotomous Perceptions of Online Government Information

11:00am, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Leveraging School-Library-Based After-School Programs to Motivate, Engage, and Benefit Youth from Disadvantaged Backgrounds

1:15pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Nicole A. Cooke

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Nicole A. Cooke is an Assistant Professor at The Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests include diversity and social justice in librarianship, information behavior, particularly in an online context, eLearning, and critical information literacy.

She has published articles in The Library Quarterly, Library and Information Science Research, InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information, and the New Review of Academic Librarianship.  Cooke co-authored Instructional Strategies and Techniques for Information Professionals (Chandos Press, 2012).

Cooke holds the PhD and MLS degrees from Rutgers University, and a M.Ed. in Adult Education from Penn State.

Diversity and Social Justice in the LIS Curriculum

10:00am, McKeldin Special Events Room

Ricardo L. Punzalan

Assistant Professor, University of Maryland

Ricardo L. Punzalan is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland College of Information Studies, where he teaches archives and digital curation. His area of research includes understanding the relationship of archives and collective memory, the politics and dynamics of digitization decision-making in collaborative and inter-institutional settings, and the uses and users of digitized archival images. His current research examines “virtual reunification” as a strategy to provide integrated access to dispersed ethnographic archival images online. He is also developing ways to effectively document, evaluate, and articulate the impact and outcomes of digitized ethnographic archives. His articles have been published in the American Archivist, Library Quarterly, Archives and Manuscripts, Archivaria, and Archival Science.

Valuing Our Scans: Understanding the Value and Impact of Digitized Ethnographic Archives

2:30pm, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Ruth V. Small

Laura J. & L. Douglas Professor, Syracuse University

Dr. Ruth V. Small is Laura J. & L. Douglas Professor and Founding Director of the Center for Digital Literacy, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University. She has authored over 100 publications, including seven books. Ruth has been PI or co-PI on 25 grants, including IMLS-funded Project ENABLE (Expanding Non-discriminatory Access By Librarians Everywhere), providing free online training to librarians worldwide in the area of library and information services to people with disabilities. Her research focuses on the application of motivation theories and models to information contexts (e.g., disabilities training, supporting innovative thinking and behavior in youth).

Promoting Inclusive Libraries and Librarians: Examples from Research and Practice

2:30pm, McKeldin Special Events Room

Stephanie Torres

Student, University of Washington

Stephanie Torres is a 2nd year MLIS student at the University of Washington and co-representative for iEquality. Her interest in Public Librarianship lie primarily in outreach and programming to underserved and marginalized communities. This stems from her prior work in education and organizing for social justice and equity.

Express to Transform: Developing an Equitable Diversity Climate Survey

11:00am, McKeldin Special Events Room

Travis Wagner

Student, University of South Carolina

Travis is a PhD student in the University of South Carolina’s School of Library and Information Sciences and has a Graduate Certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies at USC where he still teaches and lectures. He is a cataloger and processing intern at the University of South Carolina’s Moving Image Research Collections and also works as a consultant for multiple Columbia-based community archives, specifically preserving fragile audio-visual materials. His is interested in the role language-based access plays concerning content creation and distribution within moving image archives, giving specific consideration for how this affects contextual interpretation of visual information.

The Subject is Mrs. Burkett Herself: Context and Intersectionality in Moving Image Cataloging

1:15pm, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

Ursula Gorham

Lecturer, University of Maryland

Ursula Gorham, Ph.D., J.D., is a Lecturer in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland. Her research interests include the role of libraries in public policy and political processes, as well as collaborative efforts among libraries, community organizations, and government agencies to meet the legal and government information needs of underserved populations. She is the author of Public Libraries, Public Policies, and Political Processes: Serving and Transforming Communities in Times of Economic and Political Constraint (2014), with Paul T. Jaeger, John Carlo Bertot, Lindsay C. Sarin, and Libraries, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Enabling Access and Promoting Inclusion (2015), with Paul T. Jaeger and Natalie Greene Taylor. She currently serves as an Associate Editor of Library Quarterly.

The Emerging Role of Public Libraries in the Access to Justice Movement

10:00am, St. Mary's Hall Multipurpose Room

William N. Myhill

Director of Legal Research and Writing, Syracuse University

Mr. William N. Myhill is Director of Legal Research and Writing at the Burton Blatt Institute and works at the intersections of law, education and technology, collaborating with diverse individuals with disabilities through extensive research, teaching, and advocacy. He has a lifetime of personal experience with disability, and is co-PI for Project ENABLE, developing and teaching its curriculum and resources for creating inclusive library programs and services. William is a board member of the Disability Rights Bar Association, an organization of dedicated disability civil rights attorneys and scholars, and the author of several dozen legal and educational publications.

Promoting Inclusive Libraries and Librarians: Examples from Research and Practice

2:30pm, McKeldin Special Events Room